The CAT scan search for the perfect lamb chop

16 May 2012

Australians love their lamb, but health-conscious meat-eaters are looking to leaner lamb chops for the dining table. Now farmers have a new tool to help them choose sheep most likely to produce the lamb people want – and it all started with a machine that has transformed medical testing, the CAT scanner. PhD student Fiona…  Read More...

Nano solution to sick building syndrome

16 May 2012

‘Sick building syndrome’ causes persistent illness in office workers and costs the Australian economy an estimated $12 billion a year, but nanotechnology may have an answer. Sick buildings are created when fumes given off from a range of products: paints, photocopiers, office furnishings and plastics. Known as volatile organic compounds, these fumes are a major…  Read More...

New test identifies attention difficulties in kids as one cause of listening problems

16 May 2012

Children with poor listening skills can now be distinguished from those with hearing problems thanks to a new test created by HEARing Cooperative Research Centre Researcher Imran Dhamani. The problem emerged as anxious parents reported their children as having difficulty in listening, especially in noisy classrooms. It may affect as many as one child in…  Read More...

Deep collaboration with solar, sheep, sensitive hearing aids, chicken vaccines and green steel reaps $billions

16 May 2012

Deep collaboration with industry and across sciences has won five innovative research projects an Australian Collaborative Innovation Award for 2012. Announced this evening [Wednesday 16 May 2012], the awards recognise the impacts of collaboration on advancing Australian technology and knowhow. Pluto technology, the world’s most commercially successful photovoltaic cell, has increased solar cell efficiency to…  Read More...

Australia lagging way behind other OECD countries in innovation

15 May 2012

Australia’s innovation performance compared to other OECD countries is “appalling”, according to Professor Robin Batterham, Kernot Professor at the University of Melbourne and former Australian Chief Scientist. Professor Batterham, a keynote speaker at the Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs) Association conference in Adelaide today (15 May 2012) said Australia had only one third the average number…  Read More...

Risk aversion is the enemy of innovation

14 May 2012

Science agencies need to take more risks in how they communicate with the public, according to US scientist-turned-filmmaker Randy Olson who will be in Adelaide this week. “We have a crisis here in the US,” says Olson. “The scientists are trying to communicate about climate change but the general public are not buying it. The…  Read More...

Have taste and soul disappeared from modern food?

14 May 2012

Dr Rosemary Stanton, Sophie Thomson, Philip Bruem, Andre Ursini, Mark Tester and Rob Lewis debate innovation in our food Innovation in agriculture, driven by a growing population and increasing climate variability, has lead to ‘fast’ food. Six opinionated panellists will examine if it’s time to slow down. Almost a third of Australia’s GDP comes from…  Read More...

Fund Australia’s needs, not just students’ choices: Chief Scientist

8 May 2012

Professor Ian Chubb to address what Australia needs, along with discussion on what students and industry want On 17 May, Australia’s Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb will provide a glimpse into the health of Australian science. He is the key speaker in a plenary session on ‘Enhancing returns: what Australia wants, what students want and…  Read More...

DSTO champions more efficient collaborations between university and industry

3 May 2012

Australia’s 2011 defence expenditure may have been only one twenty-ninth that of the US’s $698 billion, but that hasn’t stopped its front-line personnel being among the most well-trained and safest in the world. To achieve this, Australia’s Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has been collaborating with Australian universities and industry for years. Collaboration is…  Read More...

Swimming with the desert fishes good news for Murray Darling

18 May 2011

The desert is probably the last place on Earth you’d expect to see a fish. But Dr Adam Kerezsy of the eWater Cooperative Research Centre knows better; he has recorded more than 40,000 desert fish and says the information gleaned may bring good news for the wildlife of the Murray Darling Basin. The Mulligan River…  Read More...